Two New Funds to Support Local Animal Shelters

We are all feeling the effects of a poor economy and, unfortunately, people’s pets often suffer and end up in the shelter.  Every animal leaves an imprint on your heart, but the ones that come in with injuries are imprinted not only on your heart but in your mind.

Through funding generously provided by the Viola J. Moore Animal Fund and the Rubye Cunningham Memorial Fund – Supporting the Roscommon County Animal Shelter, the Roscommon County Community Foundation continues it’s support of animals in need.  We will be able to use these funds to help provide medical and veterinary care, other than spaying or neutering expenses, for animals such as Tootie and Rocky.

Tootie
Tootie

Tootie came in to the shelter as a stray.  She was an exceptionally nice dog – quiet, well mannered – and got along great with other dogs.  Tootie was not a standout, something that would jump out at you and say “I have to make her mine.”  Get her out of her kennel, and you were immediately smitten with her.  Shortly after coming to the shelter, we noticed that her eyes were developing some kind of infection so we took her to the vet.  Tootie had an eye problem where her eyelids turned inward; a very painful condition. We decided if we were going to do the surgery, we would have her spayed while she was under anesthetic. We got lucky with Tootie as the doctors only had to perform the surgery on her lower lids.  We kept our fingers crossed that we wouldn’t have to do the upper lids.  It was a success, and the cost was only $300, including having her spayed.  One week out of surgery and Tootie found her “forever” family.  Her new family says she is very special to them.

Rocky
Rocky

Maybe you remember reading about Rocky in the local paper or saw his story on the 9&10 News. Rocky had been hit by a car. It was touch and go with the young Boxer/St.Bernard mix.  He had won over the hearts of everyone he met; i.e., the Animal Control Officers who stayed by his side, the vet techs and the veterinarians.  No matter how much pain Rocky was in, he would always give a grateful, slobbery kiss. The vet started treating him for a punctured lung, then complications.  His severely injured back leg would have to wait.  You might be asking yourself, why would we spend this kind of money on an animal?  Have you  ever had to stop on the side of the road and hold on to an injured animal?  His eyes are filled with trust; he cries out in pain but never once tries to harm you. In the morning, you have to face yourself in the mirror.  You have to be able say at least we tried; we did everything that we possibly could.  We begged and pleaded to get the funds needed to help Rocky.  His mounting vet bills will total over $4,000 – was he worth it?  According to his foster parents, he was worth every penny.

These situations are only a small portion of our medical expenses.  A large majority of the animals coming to the shelter are positive for worms, mange and other infections, and corrective treatment puts a real burden on the budget.  Officer MacKillop makes sure every dog and cat coming in to the shelter receives immunization against shelter borne viruses. This past year, we struggled to keep down a horrible upper respiratory infection we had going around the shelter with over 80 cats. We tried several antibiotics before we were able to get it under control.

I hope these stories have shed some light on the shelter’s need for monetary assistance, and your needed donations to the two funds supporting our efforts.